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Community

YWCA Grandparent Support Network opens to Pender County grandparents

The Grandparents Support Network (GSN) is a peer support group for grandparents or relative caregivers who are providing full-time care for their grandchildren.

GSN meetings the third Thursday of each month, starting at 5:30 p.m. Due to the pandemic, all meetings are virtual. All meetings are free.

Sign-ups are available at https://bit.ly/3m72Qc

Program highlights include:

  • Education on relevant topics from expert
    guest speakers
  • Social and emotional skill-building
    groups and physical activities for
    grandchildren
  • Academic support for students through
    case management
  • Social support for grandchildren from
    peers and trained, professional staff
  • Acknowledge ACE (Adverse Childhood
    Experiences) by promoting resiliency &
    the five protective factors

Learn more about GSN www.ywca-lowercapefear.org/gsn
Partner with Prevent Child Abuse America and use Circle of Parents Self-
Help Support Model


Services available at no cost to participants.

Warm weather, recent rains bring mosquitoes and potential for diseases

Pender County Health Department Urges Residents to Take Precautions

The Pender County Health Department is encouraging residents to take the necessary precautions to prevent mosquito bites because recent weather conditions have created an environment for mosquitoes to thrive. Mosquitoes carry diseases such as the Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and West Nile Virus (WNV).

To prevent mosquito bites, it’s important to remember to Tip, Toss and Cover.

Once a week:
TIP CONTAINERS– drain standing water from garbage cans, pet bowls, birdbaths, flower pots, gutters, pool covers or any other container that has collected standing water. Mosquitoes lay eggs in standing water.
TOSS– old tires, drums, bottles and other outdoor items that are outside and are not being used.
EMPTY AND SCRUB-birdbaths and pet’s water bowls at least once or twice a week.
Once a month:
MAINTAIN– apply a larvicide to standing water that cannot be emptied or drained. Larvicides can be found at home improvement and hardware stores.
Cover yourself with:
CLOTHING: Wear long, loose, and light- colored clothing and shoes and socks.
REPELLENT: Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label.

“We have been educating the public to help stop mosquitoes from living and multiplying around their homes and business” says Benjamin Kane, who heads up the mosquito control program for Pender

Contact Pender County Health Department’s Mosquito and Vector Control Hotline at 910-259-1326 for more information or visit their website.

NC Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) Highlights of Phase 1

On May 5th, Governor Cooper modified North Carolina’s Stay At Home Executive Order, transitioning the state to Phase 1 of slowly easing COVID-19 restrictions. Executive Order 138 begins on Friday, May 8 at 5:00 pm.

 

Highlights of Phase 1 include:

 

  • Any retail business may open at 50 percent capacity. Businesses will be required to practice social distancing, perform frequent cleanings, provide hand sanitizer when available, screen workers for symptoms and more.
  • People may leave their homes for commercial activity at any business that is open.
  • Certain businesses remain closed, including bars, personal care businesses, entertainment venues, and gyms. Restaurants may only continue to serve customers for drive-through, take-out and delivery.
  • Teleworking is still encouraged for businesses that can practice it.
  • Cloth face coverings are recommended when you leave the house and may be near other people who are not family or household members.

 

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) created several materials to help businesses navigate Phase 1, including:

 

  • NCDHHS Checklist for Business Owners
  • Interim Guidance for Owners, Staff, and Patrons of Businesses
  • Symptom Screening Checklist
  • Templates to Meet Required Signage

 

DHHS also previewed a new campaign, Know Your Ws! While North Carolinians should still stay home, if they go out, they should know their Ws: Wear. Wait. Wash.

 

  • Wear a face covering,
  • Wait 6 feet apart from other people.
  • Wash your hands often and

 

A Know Your Ws flyer is available in English and Spanish. More materials will be coming.

 

Executive Order 138

FAQ about the Executive Order

Presentation from May 5th Press Announcement

Fact Sheet on What’s New in Phase One

FAQ on Cloth Face Coverings

Business Materials

May is National Foster Care Month – have you considered becoming a foster parent?

The Pender County Department of Social Services is seeking individuals and families to provide loving and stable temporary homes for children in the foster care program. #NationalFosterCareMonth

 

For more information please contact:

Annie Murphy, Social Worker

Pender County Department of Social Services

(910) 259-1331 or amurphy@pendercountync.gov

Pender County to receive electronics grant

BURGAW- Pender County Solid Waste will receive a grant from North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ).

“The grant of $3,673.81 is from the Electronics Management Fund,” said Kenny Keel, director of Pender County Utilities and Solid Waste.

The purpose of the grant is to manage discarded computer equipment, televisions, and other electronic devices.

Customers are reminded to only dispose of electronics in the proper containers at Hampstead, Rocky Point, Burgaw, and Willard Solid Waste Convenience Centers.

All convenience center sites can receive batteries of any type. Please dispose of any batteries in the proper area only.

Keel said the county spends an average of $200,000 per year for the proper disposal of electronics. This cost is mostly covered through payment of recycle and full use stickers purchased on a property owner’s tax bill.

Pender County to receive electronics grant

BURGAW- Pender County Solid Waste will receive a grant from North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ).

“The grant of $3,673.81 is from the Electronics Management Fund,” said Kenny Keel, director of Pender County Utilities and Solid Waste.

The purpose of the grant is to manage discarded computer equipment, televisions, and other electronic devices.

Customers are reminded to only dispose of electronics in the proper containers at Hampstead, Rocky Point, Burgaw, and Willard Solid Waste Convenience Centers.

All convenience center sites can receive batteries of any type. Please dispose of any batteries in the proper area only.

Keel said the county spends an average of $200,000 per year for the proper disposal of electronics. This cost is mostly covered through payment of recycle and full use stickers purchased on a property owner’s tax bill.

Pender County festivals and events receive three state awards

BURGAW – Pender County area festivals and events were recipients of three state awards from the North Carolina Association of Festivals and Events (NCAFE).

The three statewide winners include Poplar Grove Plantation in the category of Best Event Poster for a Small Event. The poster promoted Poplar Grove’s popular “A Merry Little Christmas Festival.”

The North Carolina Spot Festival won the Best T-Shirt for Medium Events.

The North Carolina Blueberry Festival received top honors for the Best Poster for Medium Events.

Pender County Tourism nominated local festivals and events in a variety of categories at ShowFest, the annual gathering of NCAFE members in Charlotte.

“I was pleased to represent Pender County Tourism and the wonderful festivals and events held in our county,” said Stephanie Key, Pender County tourism assistant.

“We love promoting our festivals and events,” said Key. “They are an important tourist attraction.”

The theme of this year’s ShowFest was 2020 Vision. For more information about NCAFE visit online at www.ncfestivals.com.

 

Need Internet? Take the survey on FasterPender.com

ATMC, a cooperative based in Brunswick County, is seeking a grant to provide Internet service to Western Pender County. They need your input. They need your support by demonstrating how great the need is for reliable Internet in the Western portion of the county.

We urge all residents in Western Pender County to take the survey on www.FasterPender.com.

Watch this website, the Pender County Facebook page, and our local media for upcoming details.

Recruiting neighborhood volunteers for CERT program

PENDER COUNTY – Pender County will host an informational session about the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) on Jan. 14, beginning at 2:30 p.m. at the Hampstead Annex, 15060 US Hwy 17.

“The CERT program educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations,” said Tom Collins, Pender County Emergency Manager.

“CERT offers a consistent, nationwide approach to volunteer training and organization that professional responders can rely on during disaster situations, which allows them to focus on more complex tasks,” said Walter Makaryk, a CERT leader. “Through CERT, the capabilities to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters is built and enhanced.”

Anyone interested in learning about CERT should attend the Jan. 14 meeting.

“CERT volunteers are extremely important,” said Makaryk. “They are the neighborhood responders who inform emergency services of downed trees and power lines. They check on their neighbors following a disaster. They are the conduit to retrieve assistance for their neighborhood.”

Read about the CERT program at www.ready.gov/cert.

For more information, watch our Pender County Emergency Management website or Facebook. If you have not signed up for the CodeRed alert system, register for free at https://pendercountync.gov/em/special-disaster-information/emergency-notification-system/ or call 910-259-1210 for details.

Maple Hill VFD receives improved ISO rating

BURGAW – This spring residents in the Maple Hill Fire District will find a savings on their home insurance, thanks to the work of the Maple Hill Volunteer Fire Department, the Pender County Fire Marshal, and the NC Department of Insurance.

“Maple Hill VFD has received a North Carolina Department of Insurance (NCDOI) Insurance Rating of a 5/9E,” said Tommy Batson, Pender County Fire Marshal. “The fire department along with other fire departments and other agencies were graded on a point scale in September for this final grade.”

Batson said the point system grading system includes 10 percent from Emergency Communications Center. Fire department makes up 50 percent of the points system. Water supply is 40 percent and Community Risk Reduction makes up the last 5.5 percent for a total of 105.5 points.

“The Maple Hill VFD has been a Class 9 and was the minimum rate fire protection class,” Batson said. “The Office of the State Fire Marshal comes in and reviews many different things in the different areas of the grading system. After a few months the final score from a Class 1 being the best to a Class 10 having no fire protection coverage is finalized.”

We’re pleased that homeowners in March 2020 will receive a savings when the new insurance rating will go into effect,” said George Brown, Chairman of the Pender County Board of Commissioners. “The fire insurance premium drop will be for all fire insurance policies that are within the five-mile district of the Maple Hill VFD.”

“Anyone living in the five to six-mile area will continue to receive a class 9 E ratings,” said Batson.

“This will substantially reduce insurance rates for homeowners and commercial businesses in the district. Anywhere from $150 to possibly $250 a year based upon the insurance company,” Lee Kennedy, a rating inspector for the North Carolina State Fire Marshal said.

“It was a combination between our department, Nine Mile, Pin Hook, Haws Run, Pender EMS & Fire, and Burgaw,” said Harold Motley, Maple Hill fire chief. “We did water shuttles, we trained together. We do these things to increase the amount of water we can bring to a fire and of course, the engines and the fire trucks and the manpower.”

Residents with questions regarding the ISO rating should contact their insurance carrier.

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